Category Archives: Wage & Hour

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Timothy Long and Lindsay Hutner to Participate at Bridgeport’s Independent Contractor, Joint Employment Misclassification Litigation 2020 Teleconference

Timothy Long and Lindsay Hutner of global law firm Greenberg Traurig, LLP will participate in the Independent Contractor, Joint Employment Misclassification Litigation Teleconference program on June 30. Hosted by Bridgeport Continuing Education, the teleconference will discuss the challenges of how to classify independent contractors and employees and which employees are exempt. According to its website, Bridgeport … Continue Reading

New York Sick Leave, Disability, and Paid Family Leave Benefits for Employees Quarantined Due To COVID-19

On March 18, new legislation was enacted in New York state to provide additional paid sick leave, as well as insurance benefits under paid family leave (“PFL”) and statutory disability (“DBL”) policies to employees subject to a mandatory or precautionary order of quarantine. This legislation is limited to where there is a mandatory or precautionary … Continue Reading

Joint Employment Update: NLRB Issues Final Rule; 17 States Sue to Enjoin New DOL Rule

On the heels of our reporting that new DOL joint employment regulations are set to take effect March 16, the NLRB jumped into the fray and issued a final rule effective April 27, 2020, restoring a joint employment standard that had been followed for several decades prior to the Browning-Ferris decision issued by the Obama-controlled … Continue Reading

Some Relief: DOL Provides Flexibility and Clarity With New Joint Employer Rules

See our Feb. 28 update regarding the new joint employer rule. On March 16, 2020, new rules on joint employment status under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) will go into effect. The new rules should provide clarity and relief for employers struggling to determine whether they would be treated as joint employers by the … Continue Reading

Second Circuit Holds Judicial Approval Not Required When Settling FLSA Claim Pursuant to Rule 68(a) Offer of Judgment

On Dec. 6, 2019, the Second Circuit issued a decision in Yu v. Hasaki Restaurant, Inc. that will likely impact settlement of wage and hour actions under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). In a split decision, the court reversed a district court ruling and held that judicial approval is not required when settling an FLSA claim … Continue Reading

Chicago ‘Fair Workweek’ Ordinance Requires Employers to Provide Scheduling Notice to Covered Employees

On July 24, 2019, the city of Chicago enacted the Chicago Fair Workweek Ordinance, intended to “enact and enforce fair and equitable employment scheduling practices in the City of Chicago…” Most provisions of the Ordinance go into effect on July 1, 2020. The Ordinance covers employers primarily engaged in building services, health care, hotel, manufacturing, … Continue Reading

New Jersey Implements Steep Sanctions for Wage Payment Violations

On Aug. 6, 2019, New Jersey Acting Gov. Sheila Oliver signed a new “wage theft” law that expands the fines, penalties, and damages to be imposed for violations of the state’s wage payment law for an extended six-year statute of limitations period. The law takes effect immediately. In this GT Alert we explore the new … Continue Reading

2018 Year in Review: California L&E

There are myriad special rules for employers operating in California, and even more were signed into law last term. 2018 was Jerry Brown’s last year of his second “two-term” round as governor. Both legislatively and judicially, 2018 was a busy year, with the legislature sending more than 1,000 bills to the governor. This GT Alert … Continue Reading

Illinois Legislative Update: Amendments to the Illinois Human Rights Act and Illinois Wage Payment and Collection Act

In the week of Aug. 24, 2018, Governor Bruce Rauner approved amendments to the Illinois Human Rights Act (IHRA) and the Illinois Wage Payment and Collection Act (IWPCA). The IHRA amendments go into effect immediately and increase the timeframe for employees to file a charge; restructure the Illinois Human Rights Commission (the Commission); and allow … Continue Reading

California Supreme Court Holds California Statutes and Wage Orders do not Incorporate FLSA De Minimis Doctrine; Declines to Decide Whether De Minimis Principle May Ever Apply to Wage and Hour Claims

On July 26, 2018, the California Supreme Court issued a long-awaited decision in Troester v. Starbucks Corporation, in which it considered the applicability of the de minimis doctrine to claims for unpaid wages under the California Labor Code. The de minimis doctrine is an application of the legal maxim that “the law does not concern itself with … Continue Reading

Massachusetts to Phase-In Minimum Wage Hike, Eliminate Sunday Premium Pay, and Provide Paid Family and Medical Leave

On June 28, 2018, Massachusetts Governor Baker signed into law “An Act Relative to Minimum Wage, Paid Family Medical Leave, and the Sales Tax Holiday.” The new law will gradually increase the minimum wage over the next five years; phase-out premium Sunday pay for retail employees; and create a paid family and medical leave program … Continue Reading

Massachusetts Pay Equity Law Takes Effect July 1, 2018

Massachusetts employers are reminded that key amendments to the Massachusetts Equal Pay Act (MEPA) take effect on July 1, 2018. “An Act to Establish Pay Equity” was signed into law on Aug. 1, 2016, with an effective date of July 1, 2018.  A previous GT Alert (“Massachusetts Enacts Comprehensive Pay Equity Law,” August 2016) discusses the … Continue Reading

New Jersey Adopts State-Wide Mandatory Paid Sick Leave

Earlier this month, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed a much-anticipated state-wide paid sick leave law.  The law, which will go into effect Oct. 29, 2018, requires all New Jersey employers – regardless of size – to provide paid sick leave to their employees, whether full- or part-time.  Notably, while dubbed the “paid sick leave … Continue Reading

California Supreme Court Creates New Worker Classification Test

On Monday, April 30, 2018, the California Supreme Court issued its long-awaited ruling in Dynamex Operations West v. Superior Court. The new ruling adopts a new worker classification test and makes it easier for independent contractors to be found to be employees under California Industrial Welfare Commission (IWC) wage orders, which impose obligations relating to … Continue Reading

Ninth Circuit: Employers May Not Consider Salary History in Deciding to Pay Men and Woman Differently

The day before Equal Pay Day, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, sitting en banc, ruled that employers defending claims under the Equal Pay Act cannot rely on workers’ past salaries in any respect in trying to justify pay disparities between women and men. Aileen Rizo v. Jim Yovino, 16-15372, 2018 WL … Continue Reading

New Jersey Legislation Raises the Stakes in Unequal Pay Claims

Last week, the New Jersey Legislature passed a high profile bill proposing sweeping amendments to New Jersey’s Law Against Discrimination (LAD). The most noteworthy amendments are designed to broaden LAD’s protections against alleged discriminatory pay practices. If Governor Murphy signs the bill into law, as is almost certain, New Jersey’s equal pay law will be … Continue Reading

PA Superior Court: For Some Employees, PA Law Requires More Overtime Compensation

Employers with operations in Pennsylvania should beware that a recent Pennsylvania Superior Court opinion confirmed what federal courts in Pennsylvania previously predicted:  Pennsylvania law entitles certain employees to more overtime pay than federal law. On Dec. 22, 2017, Judge Jeffery Moulton ruled that the Pennsylvania Minimum Wage Act (PMWA) entitles a nonexempt, salaried employee to … Continue Reading

New York State Department of Labor Proposes Expansion to Call-In Regulations as New York City Council Weighs Passing Right to Flex-Time Law

This year, New York City and New York State advanced a series of legislative and regulatory proposals affecting New York’s businesses and their employees. Following four public hearings across the state, the New York State Department of Labor (DOL) proposed regulations that would expand the current “call-in” regulations by requiring two weeks’ advance notice of … Continue Reading

Avoiding Holiday Season Employment Headaches

As the holiday season approaches, employees look forward to time with family, vacations, and holiday festivities, all of which can mean requesting more time off or calling in sick.  For retailers, however, the holiday season typically means increased customer demand, staffing challenges, and potential for more wage and hour exposure.  Given these issues – and … Continue Reading

Closing the Salary Gap & Practical Tips for Employers

Given the national spotlight on pay equity, in 2016 there was a radical change in the equal pay legal landscape, as federal administrative agencies and states implemented laws and regulations to improve and enforce pay equity for individuals in protected classes (i.e., sex, race, ethnicity, gender identity, color, religion, national origin, and sexual orientation). Prior … Continue Reading

The DOJ’s Evolving View of the Interplay Between the Federal Arbitration Act and the National Labor Relations Act

Employers in the gaming and hospitality arena are eagerly awaiting the results of the upcoming changes to the legal landscape that are expected to emerge from a business-oriented administration. These employers have long tried to reduce the costs and length of litigation, particularly in the context of wage and hour claims, by requiring employees to … Continue Reading

New York City to Prohibit Employer Inquiries into Salary History

On May 4, 2017, New York City amended its Human Rights Law (NYCHRL) to join the growing number of municipalities that prohibit employers from inquiring about applicants’ wage history. Ostensibly designed to “help break the cycle of gender pay inequity[,]” this new restriction may open employers to yet another theory the plaintiffs’ bar can seek … Continue Reading

Philadelphia Becomes the First City to Prohibit Employers from Asking Applicants About Salary History

Employers who just last year revised their application forms to eliminate initial questions about past arrests and convictions, now have to revise them again to remove questions regarding current and past salary. On Jan. 23, 2017, Philadelphia’s mayor signed a wage equity ordinance (the Ordinance) which prohibits, among other things, employers from asking job applicants … Continue Reading

NY Governor Directs Contractors Doing Business with or Bidding on State Contracts to Disclose Employee Salary Information to Identify Wage Disparities

On Jan. 9, 2017, New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo signed Executive Order 162, which requires state contracts and procurements entered into or issued as of June 1, 2017, to include new reporting obligations for contractors, subcontractors, and bidders. Employers seeking to contract with the State will be required to disclose, on at least a … Continue Reading
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