Skip to content

On Nov. 1 New York enacted legislation to cover caring for siblings under New York’s Paid Family Leave law. Currently, the law does not include care for a sibling with a serious health condition as a basis for paid leave.

The New York Paid Family Leave law provides workers with job-protected, paid time off to bond with a newborn child, including a biological, adopted, or fostered child; to care for a family member with a serious health condition (which may include severe cases of COVID-19); or to assist a family member, such as a spouse, domestic partner, child, or parent, who is deployed abroad on active military service. Also, paid family leave may be available in certain circumstances when an employee or the employee’s minor, dependent child is under an order of quarantine or isolation due to COVID-19. Eligible workers may take up to 12 weeks off at 67% of their pay up to a cap, which for 2021 is $971.61 per week. The payments are funded through an employee-paid insurance program.

Continue reading the full GT Alert.

Print:
EmailTweetLikeLinkedIn
Photo of Eric B. Sigda Eric B. Sigda

Eric B. Sigda is a shareholder in Greenberg Traurig’s Labor & Employment Practice. He represents management in litigating federal and state employment matters including claims involving allegations of discrimination, harassment, whistleblowing, Sarbanes-Oxley retaliation, breach of contract, wage and hour class actions, misappropriation of…

Eric B. Sigda is a shareholder in Greenberg Traurig’s Labor & Employment Practice. He represents management in litigating federal and state employment matters including claims involving allegations of discrimination, harassment, whistleblowing, Sarbanes-Oxley retaliation, breach of contract, wage and hour class actions, misappropriation of trade secrets and violations of restrictive covenants. Eric has handled matters in federal and state courts and in arbitration. He has also represented clients before various agencies including the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the U.S. Department of Labor, and the New York State Division of Human Rights. He also regularly represents management in disputes with labor unions.

In addition, Eric counsels employers of all sizes on labor and employment matters such as family and medical leave, disability questions, employee handbooks, employee discharge and discipline, diversity and harassment training and contingent workforce issues.

He has wide-ranging experience reviewing, negotiating and preparing employment agreements.

Photo of Nicholas A. Corsano Nicholas A. Corsano

Nicholas Corsano focuses his practice on federal and state labor and employment counseling and litigation. Mr. Corsano advises and counsels clients on employment disputes involving Title VII, ADEA, ADA, and state/city statutes pertaining to employment regulations. He has experience handling single-plaintiff claims brought

Nicholas Corsano focuses his practice on federal and state labor and employment counseling and litigation. Mr. Corsano advises and counsels clients on employment disputes involving Title VII, ADEA, ADA, and state/city statutes pertaining to employment regulations. He has experience handling single-plaintiff claims brought in state and federal courts and before administrative agencies. Mr. Corsano also counsels clients on anti-harassment and anti-discrimination policies and procedures to promote a more inclusive workplace.

Additionally, Mr. Corsano has experience handling single-plaintiff and class claims concerning contested finance agreements on behalf of lenders, FDCPA and TCPA actions on behalf of financial service corporations, insurance coverage claims, and other commercial disputes.