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On July 18, 2018, Governor Brown signed AB 2282, the Fair Pay Act Bill, into law to clarify Labor Code sections 432.3 and 1197.5 (also known as the California Equal Pay Act), which collectively dictate how employers can use salary history information of employees and applicants for employment. Existing law prohibits California employers from asking job “applicants” for salary history information and requires them to provide “applicants” with the “pay scale” for a position upon “reasonable request.” Existing law also prohibits employers from paying employees of one sex less than the other for substantially similar work and prohibits prior salary, by itself, from justifying any pay disparity.

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Photo of Tayanah C. Miller Tayanah C. Miller

Tayanah (“Tay”) Miller represents corporate clients in a variety of labor and employment matters, including complex wage and hour collective and class actions, traditional labor matters, discrimination and retaliation claims, wrongful termination lawsuits, and common law tort claims. She has defended clients in

Tayanah (“Tay”) Miller represents corporate clients in a variety of labor and employment matters, including complex wage and hour collective and class actions, traditional labor matters, discrimination and retaliation claims, wrongful termination lawsuits, and common law tort claims. She has defended clients in matters arising under the California Labor Code, the Fair Labor Standards Act, the National Labor Relations Act, the Fair Employment and Housing Act, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, and various other federal and state laws. She also maintains a robust employment counseling practice.

Tay has experience at all stages of litigation. She has managed and conducted factual investigations and discovery, drafted discovery and dispositive motions, argued motions, and developed trial strategies. She also has mediation, settlement, and trial experience.

During law school, Tay interned at the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment Benefits Security Administration where she helped administer the Voluntary Fiduciary Correction Program.

Photo of Lindsay E. Hutner Lindsay E. Hutner

Lindsay E. Hutner focuses her practice on employment law, with an emphasis on litigation matters. She represents clients in both federal and state courts, as well as before administrative agencies, defending companies in both class actions and single-plaintiff cases involving employment discrimination, harassment,

Lindsay E. Hutner focuses her practice on employment law, with an emphasis on litigation matters. She represents clients in both federal and state courts, as well as before administrative agencies, defending companies in both class actions and single-plaintiff cases involving employment discrimination, harassment, retaliation, wage and hour, unfair competition, enforcement of non-competes and other restrictive covenants, misappropriation of trade secrets, wrongful termination, and breach of contract.

To mitigate risk, Lindsay advises employers on all facets of employment relationships, including the design and implementation of employment practices and handbooks, proper employee classification, wage and hour concerns, family and medical leave, workplace investigations, risk assessment of harassment and discrimination claims, terminations, and various employment laws, including the California Fair Employment and Housing Act, California wage and hour laws, Business & Professions Code section 17200, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, California Family Rights Act, the federal Family Medical Leave Act and the Fair Labor Standards Act.  She also conducts on-site trainings and workplace audits.   She also drafts all types of employment agreements, including executive employment contracts and severance and release agreements.