Tag Archives: Eric Sigda

Attention New York Employers: When It Comes to Workplace Harassment, Times Are Changing

On August 12, 2019, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed new legislation amending the New York State Human Rights Law (the “NYSHRL”), changing the State law’s previous adherence to certain fundamental principles of federal law concerning employment harassment generally, including the standard for determining employer liability for “hostile work environment” discrimination claims and the availability … Continue Reading

NY State Bans Discrimination Based on Religious Attire, Clothing, and Facial Hair

On August 9, 2019, New York state amended its Human Rights Law (NYSHRL) to expressly include the workplace protection of religious attire, clothing, and facial hair. The law becomes effective in sixty (60) days, on October 8, 2019. While religious discrimination has long been outlawed under both state and federal law, this amendment makes clear … Continue Reading

Court of Appeals Upholds DOL’s Interpretation of NY’s Minimum Wage Order as Applied to Live-In Home Health Aides

On March 26, 2019, in a 5-2 ruling, the Court of Appeals ruled in favor of providers in a critical decision affecting home health care. Andryeyeva v. N.Y. Health Care, Inc. and Moreno v. Future Care Health Servs. et al. was a joint appeal in a case that threatened to eviscerate an important economic constraint … Continue Reading

New NYC Sick Leave Law Expands Usage for Persons ‘Equivalent of Family’ and Safe Leave

The New York City Department of Consumer Affairs has issued a revised Notice of Employee Rights under the Earned Safe and Sick Time Act (ESSTA), formerly the Earned Sick Time Act (ESTA), codified at § 20-911 et seq. Effective May 5, 2018, ESSTA now permits employees to use sick and safe time to address safety … Continue Reading

Gaining Whistleblower Protection: Engaging in Activity Protected by Dodd-Frank is Not Enough

Written by Michael J. Slocum and Eric B. Sigda. A district court recently ruled that an employee simply engaging in activity protected by the Dodd-Frank Act’s anti-retaliation provision is insufficient to gain whistleblower protection. The employee must first qualify as a whistleblower within the Act’s definition. The authors of this Greenberg Traurig Alert discuss the … Continue Reading
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